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Configuring the inventory

In this chapter, you can find the information on how to configure the openstack-ansible dynamic inventory to your needs.

Introduction

Common OpenStack services and their configuration are defined by OpenStack-Ansible in the /etc/openstack_deploy/openstack_user_config.yml settings file.

Additional services should be defined with a YAML file in /etc/openstack_deploy/conf.d, in order to manage file size.

The /etc/openstack_deploy/env.d directory sources all YAML files into the deployed environment, allowing a deployer to define additional group mappings. This directory is used to extend the environment skeleton, or modify the defaults defined in the inventory/env.d directory.

To understand how the dynamic inventory works, see Understanding the inventory.

경고

Never edit or delete the files /etc/openstack_deploy/openstack_inventory.json or /etc/openstack_deploy/openstack_hostnames_ips.yml. This can lead to file corruptions, and problems with the inventory: hosts and container could disappear and new ones would appear, breaking your existing deployment.

Configuration constraints

Group memberships

When adding groups, keep the following in mind:

  • A group can contain hosts

  • A group can contain child groups

However, groups cannot contain child groups and hosts.

The lxc_hosts Group

When the dynamic inventory script creates a container name, the host on which the container resides is added to the lxc_hosts inventory group.

Using this name for a group in the configuration will result in a runtime error.

Deploying directly on hosts

To deploy a component directly on the host instead of within a container, set the is_metal property to true for the container group in the container_skel section in the appropriate file.

The use of container_vars and mapping from container groups to host groups is the same for a service deployed directly onto the host.

You can also use the no_containers option to specify a host that will have all services deployed on metal inside of it.

참고

The cinder-volume component is deployed directly on the host by default. See the env.d/cinder.yml file for this example.

Example: Running all controllers on metal

For example, if you’d like to run all your controllers on metal, you would have the following inside your openstack_user_config.yml.

infra_hosts:
  infra1:
    ip: 172.39.123.11
    no_containers: true
  infra2:
    ip: 172.39.123.12
    no_containers: true
  infra3:
    ip: 172.39.123.13
    no_containers: true

Example: Running galera on dedicated hosts

For example, to run Galera directly on dedicated hosts, you would perform the following steps:

  1. Modify the container_skel section of the env.d/galera.yml file. For example:

    container_skel:
      galera_container:
        belongs_to:
          - db_containers
        contains:
          - galera
        properties:
          is_metal: true
    

    참고

    To deploy within containers on these dedicated hosts, omit the is_metal: true property.

  2. Assign the db_containers container group (from the preceding step) to a host group by providing a physical_skel section for the host group in a new or existing file, such as env.d/galera.yml. For example:

    physical_skel:
      db_containers:
        belongs_to:
          - all_containers
      db_hosts:
        belongs_to:
          - hosts
    
  3. Define the host group (db_hosts) in a conf.d/ file (such as galera.yml). For example:

    db_hosts:
      db-host1:
        ip: 172.39.123.11
      db-host2:
        ip: 172.39.123.12
      db-host3:
        ip: 172.39.123.13
    

    참고

    Each of the custom group names in this example (db_containers and db_hosts) are arbitrary. Choose your own group names, but ensure the references are consistent among all relevant files.

Deploying 0 (or more than one) of component type per host

When OpenStack-Ansible generates its dynamic inventory, the affinity setting determines how many containers of a similar type are deployed on a single physical host.

Using shared-infra_hosts as an example, consider this openstack_user_config.yml configuration:

shared-infra_hosts:
  infra1:
    ip: 172.29.236.101
  infra2:
    ip: 172.29.236.102
  infra3:
    ip: 172.29.236.103

Three hosts are assigned to the shared-infra_hosts group, OpenStack-Ansible ensures that each host runs a single database container, a single Memcached container, and a single RabbitMQ container. Each host has an affinity of 1 by default, which means that each host runs one of each container type.

If you are deploying a stand-alone Object Storage (swift) environment, you can skip the deployment of RabbitMQ. If you use this configuration, your openstack_user_config.yml file would look as follows:

shared-infra_hosts:
  infra1:
    affinity:
      rabbit_mq_container: 0
    ip: 172.29.236.101
  infra2:
    affinity:
      rabbit_mq_container: 0
    ip: 172.29.236.102
  infra3:
    affinity:
      rabbit_mq_container: 0
    ip: 172.29.236.103

This configuration deploys a Memcached container and a database container on each host, but no RabbitMQ containers.

Omit a service or component from the deployment

To omit a component from a deployment, you can use one of several options:

  • Remove the physical_skel link between the container group and the host group by deleting the related file located in the env.d/ directory.

  • Do not run the playbook that installs the component. Unless you specify the component to run directly on a host by using the is_metal property, a container is created for this component.

  • Adjust the Deploying 0 (or more than one) of component type per host to 0 for the host group. Similar to the second option listed here, Unless you specify the component to run directly on a host by using the is_metal property, a container is created for this component.

Deploying using a different container technology

경고

While nspawn is an available containerization technology it should be considered unmaintained and it’s support will be removed in the upcoming release.

OpenStack-Ansible presently supports two different container technologies, LXC and nspawn. These two container technologies can be used separately or together within the same cluster but has a limitation of only one setting per host.

Using shared-infra_hosts as an example, consider this openstack_user_config.yml configuration:

shared-infra_hosts:
  infra1:
    ip: 172.29.236.101
    container_vars:
      container_tech: lxc
  infra2:
    ip: 172.29.236.102
    container_vars:
      container_tech: nspawn
  infra3:
    ip: 172.29.236.103

In this example the three hosts are assigned to the shared-infra_hosts group, and will deploy containerized workloads using lxc on infra1, nspawn on infra2, and lxc on infra3. Notice infra3 does not define the container_tech option because it not required. If this option is undefined the value will automatically be set to lxc within the generated inventory. The two supported options for the container_tech configuration variable are lxc or nspawn.