Distributed Compute Node deployment

Distributed Compute Node deployment

Introduction

Additional groups of compute nodes can be deployed and integrated with an existing deployment of a control plane stack. These compute nodes are deployed in separate stacks from the main control plane (overcloud) stack, and they consume some of the stack outputs from the overcloud stack to reuse as configuration data.

Deploying these additional nodes in separate stacks provides for separation of management between the control plane stack and the stacks for additional compute nodes. The stacks can be managed, scaled, and updated separately.

Using separate stacks also creates smaller failure domains as there are less baremetal nodes in each invidiual stack. A failure in one baremetal node only requires that management operations to address that failure need only affect the single stack that contains the failed node.

A routed spine and leaf networking layout can be used to deploy these additional groups of compute nodes in a distributed nature. Not all nodes need to be co-located at the same physical location or datacenter. See Deploying Overcloud with L3 routed networking for more details.

Such an architecture is referred to as “Distributed Compute Node” or “DCN” for short.

Supported failure modes and High Availability recommendations

Handling negative scenarios for DCN starts from the deployment planning, like choosing some particular SDN solution over provider networks to meet the expected SLA.

Loss of control plane connectivity

A failure of the central control plane affects all DCN edge sites. There is no autonomous control planes at the edge. No OpenStack control plane API or CLI operations can be executed locally in that case. For example, you cannot create a snapshot of a Nova VM, or issue an auth token, nor can you delete an image or a VM.

Note

A single Controller service failure normally induces no downtime for edge sites and should be handled as for usual HA deployments.

Loss of an edge site

Running Nova VM instances will keep running. If stopped running, you need the control plane back to recover the stopped or crashed workloads. If Neutron DHCP agent is centralized, and we are forwarding DHCP requests to the central site, any VMs that are trying to renew their IPs will eventually time out and lose connectivity.

Note

A single Compute service failure normally affects only its edge site without additional downtime induced for neighbor edge sites or the central control plane.

OpenStack infrastructure services, like Nova Compute, will automatically reconnect to MariaDB database cluster and RabbitMQ broker when the control plane’s uplink is back. No timed out operations can be resumed though and need to be retried manually.

It is recommended to maintain each DCN edge site as a separate Availability Zone (AZ) for Nova/Neutron and Cinder services.

Improving resiliency for N/S and E/W traffic

Reliability of the central control plane may be enhanced with L3 HA network, which only provides North-South routing. The East-West routing effectiveness of edge networks may be improved by using DVR or highly available Open Virtual Network (OVN). There is also BGPVPN and its backend specific choices.

Network recommendations

Traditional or external provider networks with backbone routing at the edge may fulfill or complement a custom distributed routing solution, like L3 Spine-Leaf topology.

Note

Neutron SDN backends that involve tunnelling may be sub-optimal for Edge DCN cases because of the known issues 1808594 and 1808062.

For dynamic IPv4 and stateful IPv6 IPAM cases, you will also need DHCP on those provider networks in order to assign IPs to VM instances. External provider networks usually require no Neutron DHCP agents and handle IPAM (and routing) on its own. While for traditional or Routed Provider Networks, when there is no L2 connectivity to edge over WAN, and Neutron DHCP agents are placed on controllers at the central site, you should have a DHCP relay on every provider network. Alternatively, DHCP agents need to be moved to the edge. Such setups also require highly reliable links between remote and central sites.

Note

Neither of DHCP relays/agents at compute nodes, nor routed/external provider networks are tested or automated via TripleO Heat Templates. You would have to have those configured manually for your DCN environments.

Note

OVN leverages DVR and does not require running Neutron DHCP/L3 agents, which might as well simplify particular DCN setups.

That said, when there is a network failure that disconnects the edge off the central site, there is no SLA for recovery time but only what the provider networks or a particular SDN choice can guarantee. For switched/routed/MPLS provider networks, that may span from 10’s of ms to a few seconds. With the outage thresholds are typically considered to be a 15 seconds. These trace back on various standards that are relevant here.

Config-drive/cloud-init details

Config-drive uses virtual media capabilities of the BMC controller, so that no DHCP is required for VMs to obtain IP addresses at edge sites. This is the most straightforward solution. This does require that the WAN between the remote site and central site is live during deployment of a VM, but after that the VM can run independently without a connection to the central site.

Note

Config-drive may be a tricky for VMs that do not support cloud-init, like some appliance VMs. It may be that such ones (or other VMs that do not support config-drive) will have to be configured with a static IP that matches the Neutron port.

The simplest solution we recommend for DCN would involve only external provider networks at the edge. For that case, it is also recommended to use either config-drive, or IPv6 SLAAC, or another configuration mechanism other than those requiring a 169.254.169.254/32 route for the provider routers to forward data to the metadata service.

IPv6 details

IPv6 for tenants’ workloads and infrastructure tunnels interconnecting the central site and the edge is a viable option as well. IPv6 cannot be used for provisioning networks though. Key benefits IPv6 may provide for DCN are:

  • SLAAC, which is a EUI-64 form of autoconfig that makes IPv6 addresses calculated based on MAC addresses and requires no DHCP services placed on the provider networks.

  • Improved mobility for endpoints, like NFV APIs, to roam around different links and edge sites without losing its connections and IP addresses.

  • End-to-end IPv6 has been shown to have better performance by large content networks. This is largely due to the presence of NAT in most end-to-end IPv4 connections that slows them down.

Storage recommendations

DCN with only ephemeral storage is available for Nova Compute services. That is up to the edge cloud applications to be designed to provide enhanced data availability, locality awareness and/or replication mechanisms.

Deloying DCN

Deploying the DCN architecture requires consideration as it relates to the undercloud, roles, networks, and availability zones configuration. This section will document on how to approach the DCN deployment.

The deployment will make use of specific undercloud configuration, and then deploying multiple stacks, typically one stack per distributed location, although this is not a strict requirement.

At the central site, stack separation can still be used to deploy separate stacks for control plane and compute services if compute services are desired at the central site. See deploy_control_plane for more information.

Each distributed site will be a separate stack as well. See deploy_dcn for more information.

Undercloud configuration

This section describes the steps required to configure the undercloud for DCN.

Using direct deploy instead of iSCSI

In a default undercloud configuration, ironic deploys nodes using the iscsi deploy interface. When using the iscsi deploy interface, the deploy ramdisk publishes the node’s disk as an iSCSI target, and the ironic-conductor service then copies the image to this target.

For a DCN deployment, network latency is often a concern between the undercloud and the distributed compute nodes. Considering the potential for latency, the distributed compute nodes should be configured to use the direct deploy interface in the undercloud. This process is described later in this guide under Configure nodes to use the deploy interface.

When using the direct deploy interface, the deploy ramdisk will download the image over HTTP from the undercloud’s Swift service, and copy it to the node’s disk. HTTP is more resilient when dealing with network latency than iSCSI, so using the direct deploy interface provides a more stable node deployment experience for distributed compute nodes.

Configure the Swift temporary URL key

Images are served by Swift and are made available to nodes using an HTTP URL, over the direct deploy interface. To allow Swift to create temporary URLs, it must be configured with a temporary URL key. The key value is used for cryptographic signing and verification of the temporary URLs created by Swift.

The following commands demonstrate how to configure the setting. In this example, uuidgen is used to randomly create a key value. You should choose a unique key value that is a difficult to guess value. For example:

source ~/stackrc
openstack role add --user admin --project service ResellerAdmin
openstack --os-project-name service object store account set --property Temp-URL-Key=$(uuidgen | sha1sum | awk '{​print $1}')

Configure nodes to use the deploy interface

This section describes how to configure the deploy interface for new and existing nodes.

For new nodes, the deploy interface can be specified directly in the JSON structure for each node. For example, see the “deploy_interface”: “direct” setting below:

{
   "nodes":[
       {
           "mac":[
               "bb:bb:bb:bb:bb:bb"
           ],
           "name":"node01",
           "cpu":"4",
           "memory":"6144",
           "disk":"40",
           "arch":"x86_64",
           "pm_type":"ipmi",
           "pm_user":"admin",
           "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
           "pm_addr":"192.168.24.205",
           “deploy_interface”: “direct”
       },
       {
           "mac":[
               "cc:cc:cc:cc:cc:cc"
           ],
           "name":"node02",
           "cpu":"4",
           "memory":"6144",
           "disk":"40",
           "arch":"x86_64",
           "pm_type":"ipmi",
           "pm_user":"admin",
           "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
           "pm_addr":"192.168.24.206"
           “deploy_interface”: “direct”
       }
   ]
}

Existing nodes can be updated to use the direct deploy interface. For example:

openstack baremetal node set --deploy-interface direct 4b64a750-afe3-4236-88d1-7bb88c962666

Deploying the control plane

The main overcloud control plane stack should be deployed as needed for the desired cloud architecture layout. This stack contains nodes running the control plane and infrastructure services needed for the cloud. For the purposes of this documentation, this stack is referred to as the control-plane stack.

No specific changes or deployment configuration is necessary to deploy just the control plane services.

It’s recommended that the control-plane stack contain only control plane services, and no compute or storage services. If compute and storage services are desired at the same geographical site as the control-plane stack then they should be deployed in a separate stack just like a edge site specific stack, but using nodes at the same geographical location. In such a scenario, the stack with compute and storage services could be called central and deploying it in a separate stack allows for separation of management and operations.

It is suggested to give each stack an explicit name. For example, the control plane stack could be called control-plane and set by passing –stack control-plane to the openstack overcloud deploy command.

Deploying a DCN site

Once the control plane is deployed, separate deployments can be done for each DCN site. This section will document how to perform such a deployment.

Saving configuration from the overcloud

Once the overcloud control plane has been deployed, data needs to be retrieved from the overcloud Heat stack and plan to pass as input values into the separate DCN deployment.

Extract the needed data from the stack outputs:

# EndpointMap: Cloud service to URL mapping
openstack stack output show control-plane EndpointMap --format json \
  | jq '{"parameter_defaults": {"EndpointMapOverride": .output_value}}' \
  > endpoint-map.json

# AllNodesConfig: Node specific hieradata (hostnames, etc) set on all nodes
openstack stack output show control-plane AllNodesConfig --format json \
  | jq '{"parameter_defaults": {"AllNodesExtraMapData": .output_value}}' \
  > all-nodes-extra-map-data.json

# GlobalConfig: Service specific hieradata set on all nodes
openstack stack output show $STACK GlobalConfig --format json \
  | jq '{"parameter_defaults": {"GlobalConfigExtraMapData": .output_value}}' \
  > global-config-extra-map-data.json

# HostsEntry: Entries for /etc/hosts set on all nodes
openstack stack output show control-plane HostsEntry -f json \
  | jq -r '{"parameter_defaults":{"ExtraHostFileEntries": .output_value}}' \
  > extra-host-file-entries.json

The same passwords and secrets should be reused when deploying the additional compute stacks. These values can be saved from the existing control plane stack deployment with the following command:

openstack object save overcloud plan-environment.yaml
python -c "import yaml; data=yaml.safe_load(open('plan-environment.yaml').read()); print yaml.dump(dict(parameter_defaults=data['passwords']))" > passwords.yaml

Use the passwords.yaml enviornment file generated by the previous command, or reuse the environment file used to set the values for the control plane stack.

Note

The passwords.yaml generated in the previous command contains sensitive security data such as passwords and TLS certificates that are used in the overcloud deployment.

Care should be taken to keep the file as secured as possible.

Create an environment file for setting necessary oslo messaging configuration overrides:

parameter_defaults:
  <<Role>>ExtraConfig:
    oslo_messaging_notify_use_ssl: false
    oslo_messaging_rpc_use_ssl: false

In the above example, replace <<Role>> with the actual role name that is being deployed at the distributed site. For example, if the role was called Compute, the environment file would be:

parameter_defaults:
  ComputeExtraConfig:
    oslo_messaging_notify_use_ssl: false
    oslo_messaging_rpc_use_ssl: false

Reusing networks from the overcloud

When deploying separate stacks it may be necessary to reuse networks, subnets, and VIP resources between stacks if desired. Only a single Heat stack can own a resource and be responsible for its creation and deletion, however the resources can be reused in other stacks.

To reuse network related resources between stacks, the following parameters have been added to the network definitions in the network_data.yaml file format:

external_resource_network_id: Existing Network UUID
external_resource_subnet_id: Existing Subnet UUID
external_resource_segment_id: Existing Segment UUID
external_resource_vip_id: Existing VIP UUID

These parameters can be set on each network definition in the network_data.yaml file used for the deployment of the separate stack.

Not all networks need to be reused or shared across stacks. The external_resource_* parameters can be set for only the networks that are meant to be shared, while the other networks can be newly created and managed.

For example, to reuse the internal_api network from the control plane stack in a separate stack, run the following commands to show the UUIDs for the related network resources:

openstack network show internal_api -c id -f value
openstack subnet show internal_api_subnet -c id -f value
openstack port show internal_api_virtual_ip -c id -f value

Save the values shown in the output of the above commands and add them to the network definition for the internal_api network in the network_data.yaml file for the separate stack. An example network definition would look like:

- name: InternalApi
  external_resource_network_id: 93861871-7814-4dbc-9e6c-7f51496b43af
  external_resource_subnet_id: c85c8670-51c1-4b17-a580-1cfb4344de27
  external_resource_vip_id: 8bb9d96f-72bf-4964-a05c-5d3fed203eb7
  name_lower: internal_api
  vip: true
  ip_subnet: '172.16.2.0/24'
  allocation_pools: [{'start': '172.16.2.4', 'end': '172.16.2.250'}]
  ipv6_subnet: 'fd00:fd00:fd00:2000::/64'
  ipv6_allocation_pools: [{'start': 'fd00:fd00:fd00:2000::10', 'end': 'fd00:fd00:fd00:2000:ffff:ffff:ffff:fffe'}]
  mtu: 1400

Note

When not sharing networks between stacks, each network defined in network_data.yaml must have a unique name across all deployed stacks. This requirement is necessary since regardless of the stack, all networks are created in the same tenant in Neutron on the undercloud.

For example, the network name internal_api can’t be reused between stacks, unless the intent is to share the network between the stacks. The network would need to be given a different name and name_lower property such as InternalApiCompute0 and internal_api_compute_0.

Configuring Availability Zones (AZ)

Each edge site must be configured as a separate availability zone (AZ). When you deploy instances to this AZ, you can expect it to run on the remote Compute node. In addition, the central site must also be within a specific AZ (or multiple AZs), rather than the default AZ.

When also deploying persistent storage at each site, the storage backend availability zone must match the compute availability zone name.

AZs are configured differently for compute (Nova) and storage (Cinder). Configuring AZs are documented in the next sections.

Configuring AZs for Nova (compute)

The Nova AZ configuration for compute nodes in the stack can be set with the NovaComputeAvailabilityZone parameter during the deployment.

The value of the parameter is the name of the AZ where compute nodes in that stack will be added.

For example, the following environment file would be used to add compute nodes in the edge-0 stack to the edge-0 AZ:

parameter_defaults:
   NovaComputeAvailabilityZone: edge-0

It’s also possible to configure the AZ for a compute node by adding it to a host aggregate after the deployment is completed. The following commands show creating a host aggregate, an associated AZ, and adding compute nodes to a edge-0 AZ:

openstack aggregate create edge-0 --zone edge-0
openstack aggregate add host edge-0 hostA
openstack aggregate add host edge-0 hostB

Note

The above commands are run against the deployed overcloud, not the undercloud. Make sure the correct rc file for the control plane stack of the overcloud is sourced for the shell before running the commands.

Configuring AZs for Cinder (storage)

Each site that uses consistent storage is configured with its own cinder backend(s). Cinder backends are not shared between sites. Each backend is also configured with an AZ that should match the configured Nova AZ for the compute nodes that will make use of the storage provided by that backend.

The CinderStorageAvailabilityZone parameter can be used to configure the AZ for a given backend. Parameters are also available for different backend types, such as CinderISCSIAvailabilityZone, CinderRbdAvailabilityZone, and CinderNfsAvailabilityZone. When set, the backend type specific parameter will take precedence over CinderStorageAvailabilityZone.

This example shows an environment file setting the AZ for the backend in the central site:

parameter_defaults:
   CinderStorageAvailabilityZone: central

This example shows an environment file setting the AZ for the backend in the edge0 site:

parameter_defaults:
   CinderStorageAvailabilityZone: edge0

Example: DCN deployment with pre-provisioned nodes, shared networks, and multiple stacks

This example shows the deployment commands and associated environment files of a example of a DCN deployment. The deployment uses pre-provisioned nodes. All networks are shared between the multiple stacks. The example illustrates the deployment workflow of deploying multiple stacks for a real world DCN deployment.

Four stacks are deployed:

control-plane

All control plane services. Shares the same geographical location as the central stack.

central

Compute, Cinder, Ceph deployment. Shares the same geographical location as the control-plane stack.

edge0

Compute, Cinder, Ceph deployment. Separate geographical location from any other stack.

edge1

Compute, Cinder, Ceph deployment. Separate geographical location from any other stack.

Notice how the central stack will contain only compute and storage services. It is really just another instance of an edge site, but just happens to be deployed at the same geographical location as the control-plane stack. control-plane and central could instead be deployed in the same stack, however for easier manageability and separation, they are deployed in separate stacks.

This example also uses pre-provisioned nodes as documented at Using Already Deployed Servers.

Undercloud

Since this example uses pre-provisioned nodes, no additional undercloud configuration is needed. The steps in undercloud_dcn are not specifically applicable when using pre-provisioned nodes.

Deploy the control-plane stack

The control-plane stack is deployed with the following command:

openstack overcloud deploy \
  --verbose \
  --stack control-plane \
  --disable-validations \
  --templates /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates \
  -r roles-data.yaml \
  -e role-counts.yaml \
  -n network_data.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker-ha.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo/environments/containers-prepare-parameter.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/deployed-server-environment.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/deployed-server-bootstrap-environment-centos.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/net-multiple-nics.yaml \
  -e hostnamemap.yaml \
  -e network-environment.yaml \
  -e deployed-server-port-map.yaml \
  -e az.yaml

Many of the specified environments and options are not specific to DCN. The ones that relate to DCN are as follows.

--stack control-plane sets the stack name to control-plane.

The roles-data.yaml file contains only the Controller role from the templates directory at roles/Controller.yaml.

role-counts.yaml contains:

parameter_defaults:
  ControllerCount: 1

network_data.yaml contains the default contents from the templates directory.

az.yaml contains:

parameter_defaults:
  CinderStorageAvailabilityZone: 'central'
  NovaComputeAvailabilityZone: 'central'
  NovaAZAttach: false

When the deployment completes, a single stack is deployed:

(undercloud) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack stack list
+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+
| ID                                   | Stack Name    | Project | Stack Status    | Creation Time        | Updated Time         |
+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+
| 5f172fd8-97a5-4b9b-8d4c-2c931fd048e7 | control-plane | c117a9b489384603b2f45185215e9728 | CREATE_COMPLETE | 2019-03-13T18:51:08Z | 2019-03-13T19:44:27Z |
+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+

Export configuration from the control-plane stack

As documented in export_dcn, the following commands are run to save needed configuration data from the control-plane stack:

# EndpointMap: Cloud service to URL mapping
openstack stack output show control-plane EndpointMap --format json \
  | jq '{"parameter_defaults": {"EndpointMapOverride": .output_value}}' \
  > endpoint-map.json

# AllNodesConfig: Node specific hieradata (hostnames, etc) set on all nodes
openstack stack output show control-plane AllNodesConfig --format json \
  | jq '{"parameter_defaults": {"AllNodesExtraMapData": .output_value}}' \
  > all-nodes-extra-map-data.json

# GlobalConfig: Service specific hieradata set on all nodes
openstack stack output show $STACK GlobalConfig --format json \
  | jq '{"parameter_defaults": {"GlobalConfigExtraMapData": .output_value}}' \
  > $DIR/global-config-extra-map-data.json

# HostsEntry: Entries for /etc/hosts set on all nodes
openstack stack output show control-plane HostsEntry -f json \
  | jq -r '{"parameter_defaults":{"ExtraHostFileEntries": .output_value}}' \
  > extra-host-file-entries.json

openstack object save control-plane plan-environment.yaml
python -c "import yaml; data=yaml.safe_load(open('plan-environment.yaml').read()); print yaml.dump(dict(parameter_defaults=data['passwords']))" > passwords.yaml

Deploy the central stack

The central stack deploys compute and storage services to be co-located at the same site where the control-plane stack was deployed.

Before the deployment command is run, a new networks_data.yaml file needs to be created and updated with the UUIDs of the existing network resources that are reused from the control-plane stack in the central stack as documented in reuse_networks_dcn.

The following commands are used to show the UUIDs:

(undercloud) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack network list
+--------------------------------------+--------------+--------------------------------------+
| ID                                   | Name         | Subnets                              |
+--------------------------------------+--------------+--------------------------------------+
| 0fcb505b-81c8-483e-93f6-0da574e4acd5 | tenant       | e6544a7f-ec00-4b33-b7b0-a02e1c0f503a |
| 40ed54c0-1c85-4bcb-b244-0764f83d2ca8 | management   | 9ca595f9-aa92-415a-9e13-0ed8b9f78e68 |
| 447fd403-e977-436d-ba21-7d1ac258dd81 | internal_api | 3449c5f3-ebb0-4e77-b671-eb6ea209a10e |
| 47a73786-4066-49ac-9e6a-49fb5d1f964a | storage_mgmt | eb78ae43-c575-4fdd-8c3f-405f4bdd0ca5 |
| bf1fbe99-08f9-4f12-9af5-57a4f396b894 | ctlplane     | 5d366b80-a360-4b3d-be5f-c5dbd13fd7eb |
| cf19bf6e-1ed5-428b-9aab-727d43e88f3a | external     | 6fc8578c-8028-450a-b83e-bf92cfda61bc |
| ef89c994-5b8d-4a5d-aa53-ef02452665d0 | storage      | d6c975db-8943-4261-abf1-f7d2b482d88c |
+--------------------------------------+--------------+--------------------------------------+
(undercloud) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack subnet list
+--------------------------------------+---------------------+--------------------------------------+----------------+
| ID                                   | Name                | Network                              | Subnet         |
+--------------------------------------+---------------------+--------------------------------------+----------------+
| 3449c5f3-ebb0-4e77-b671-eb6ea209a10e | internal_api_subnet | 447fd403-e977-436d-ba21-7d1ac258dd81 | 172.16.2.0/24  |
| 5d366b80-a360-4b3d-be5f-c5dbd13fd7eb | ctlplane-subnet     | bf1fbe99-08f9-4f12-9af5-57a4f396b894 | 192.168.0.0/24 |
| 6fc8578c-8028-450a-b83e-bf92cfda61bc | external_subnet     | cf19bf6e-1ed5-428b-9aab-727d43e88f3a | 10.0.0.0/24    |
| 9ca595f9-aa92-415a-9e13-0ed8b9f78e68 | management_subnet   | 40ed54c0-1c85-4bcb-b244-0764f83d2ca8 | 10.0.1.0/24    |
| d6c975db-8943-4261-abf1-f7d2b482d88c | storage_subnet      | ef89c994-5b8d-4a5d-aa53-ef02452665d0 | 172.16.1.0/24  |
| e6544a7f-ec00-4b33-b7b0-a02e1c0f503a | tenant_subnet       | 0fcb505b-81c8-483e-93f6-0da574e4acd5 | 172.16.0.0/24  |
| eb78ae43-c575-4fdd-8c3f-405f4bdd0ca5 | storage_mgmt_subnet | 47a73786-4066-49ac-9e6a-49fb5d1f964a | 172.16.3.0/24  |
+--------------------------------------+---------------------+--------------------------------------+----------------+
(undercloud) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack port list
+--------------------------------------+-------------------------+-------------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+--------+
| ID                                   | Name                    | MAC Address       | Fixed IP Addresses                                                          | Status |
+--------------------------------------+-------------------------+-------------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+--------+
| 06603164-6fc0-4ca9-b480-5b73736dec01 | openstack-0_Storage     | fa:16:3e:8c:5e:8a | ip_address='172.16.1.200', subnet_id='d6c975db-8943-4261-abf1-f7d2b482d88c' | DOWN   |
| 3b2244e4-0bf2-4675-a88f-3c149a5ab634 | openstack-0_External    | fa:16:3e:67:49:95 | ip_address='10.0.0.137', subnet_id='6fc8578c-8028-450a-b83e-bf92cfda61bc'   | DOWN   |
| 7ed9ac55-fec0-4320-9ba6-d95bb5207680 | openstack-0_InternalApi | fa:16:3e:df:46:7e | ip_address='172.16.2.36', subnet_id='3449c5f3-ebb0-4e77-b671-eb6ea209a10e'  | DOWN   |
| 824081da-9205-4ed9-9a94-047dccceb8ff | storage_mgmt_virtual_ip | fa:16:3e:f9:ff:5a | ip_address='172.16.3.222', subnet_id='eb78ae43-c575-4fdd-8c3f-405f4bdd0ca5' | DOWN   |
| 894b834f-b911-42eb-a4b8-08e3b0084825 | public_virtual_ip       | fa:16:3e:d9:d2:f6 | ip_address='10.0.0.136', subnet_id='6fc8578c-8028-450a-b83e-bf92cfda61bc'   | DOWN   |
| 9daa4ac1-c7f0-4e25-a6d1-1f00e2f0ee72 | openstack-0_Tenant      | fa:16:3e:eb:b4:f7 | ip_address='172.16.0.107', subnet_id='e6544a7f-ec00-4b33-b7b0-a02e1c0f503a' | DOWN   |
| b140c67e-3755-4068-9c61-0349cee5695a | openstack-0_StorageMgmt | fa:16:3e:bc:9e:d7 | ip_address='172.16.3.49', subnet_id='eb78ae43-c575-4fdd-8c3f-405f4bdd0ca5'  | DOWN   |
| b9299348-d761-410a-b81d-4d78b2d985a9 | internal_api_virtual_ip | fa:16:3e:9f:fb:fa | ip_address='172.16.2.244', subnet_id='3449c5f3-ebb0-4e77-b671-eb6ea209a10e' | DOWN   |
| cdf8edac-55b0-4321-98fd-0201ec554c33 | storage_virtual_ip      | fa:16:3e:35:a6:55 | ip_address='172.16.1.147', subnet_id='d6c975db-8943-4261-abf1-f7d2b482d88c' | DOWN   |
| d2d6a257-b43d-4a1c-ab13-cd91aa05d6fe |                         | fa:16:3e:a3:a5:b1 | ip_address='192.168.0.5', subnet_id='5d366b80-a360-4b3d-be5f-c5dbd13fd7eb'  | ACTIVE |
+--------------------------------------+-------------------------+-------------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+--------+

A copy of the default networks_data.yaml file is created:

cp /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/networks_data.yaml site_networks_data.yaml

site_networks_data.yaml is updated the external resource ids for each network resource are added. For example, the InternalApi network definition looks like:

- name: InternalApi
  external_resource_id: 447fd403-e977-436d-ba21-7d1ac258dd81
  external_resource_subnet_id: 3449c5f3-ebb0-4e77-b671-eb6ea209a10e
  external_resource_vip_id: b9299348-d761-410a-b81d-4d78b2d985a9
  name_lower: internal_api
  vip: true
  ip_subnet: '172.16.2.0/24'
  allocation_pools: [{'start': '172.16.2.4', 'end': '172.16.2.250'}]
  ipv6_subnet: 'fd00:fd00:fd00:2000::/64'
  ipv6_allocation_pools: [{'start': 'fd00:fd00:fd00:2000::10', 'end': 'fd00:fd00:fd00:2000:ffff:ffff:ffff:fffe'}]
  mtu: 1400

The central stack is then deployed with the following command:

openstack overcloud deploy \
  --verbose \
  --stack central \
  --templates /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates \
  -r distributed-roles-data.yaml \
  -n site_network_data.yaml \
  --disable-validations \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker-ha.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo/environments/containers-prepare-parameter.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/deployed-server-environment.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/deployed-server-bootstrap-environment-centos.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/net-multiple-nics.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/low-memory-usage.yaml \
  -e role-counts.yaml \
  -e hostnamemap.yaml \
  -e network-environment.yaml \
  -e deployed-server-port-map.yaml \
  -e ceph-environment.yaml \
  -e az.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/endpoint-map.json \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/all-nodes-extra-map-data.json \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/global-config-extra-map-data.json \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/extra-host-file-entries.json \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/oslo.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/passwords.yaml

--stack central sets the stack name to central.

distributed-roles-data.yaml contains a single role called DistributedComputeHCI which contains Nova, Cinder, and Ceph services. The example role is from the templates directory at roles/DistributedComputeHCI.yaml.

role-counts.yaml contains:

parameter_defaults:
  DistributedComputeHCICount: 1

az.yaml contains the same content as was used in the control-plane stack:

parameter_defaults:
  CinderStorageAvailabilityZone: 'central'
  NovaComputeAvailabilityZone: 'central'
  NovaAZAttach: false

All of the environment files under the control-plane-export subdirectory were generated from the commands from example_export_dcn.

When the deployment completes, 2 stacks are deployed:

+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+
| ID                                   | Stack Name    | Project                          | Stack Status    | Creation Time        | Updated Time         |
+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+
| 0bdade63-4645-4490-a540-24be48527e10 | central       | c117a9b489384603b2f45185215e9728 | CREATE_COMPLETE | 2019-03-25T21:35:49Z | None                 |
| 5f172fd8-97a5-4b9b-8d4c-2c931fd048e7 | control-plane | c117a9b489384603b2f45185215e9728 | CREATE_COMPLETE | 2019-03-13T18:51:08Z | None                 |
+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+

The AZ and aggregate configuration for Nova can be checked and verified with these commands. Note that the rc file for the control-plane stack must be sourced as these commands talk to overcloud APIs:

(undercloud) [centos@scale ~]$ source control-planerc
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack aggregate list
+----+---------+-------------------+
| ID | Name    | Availability Zone |
+----+---------+-------------------+
|  9 | central | central           |
+----+---------+-------------------+
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack aggregate show central
+-------------------+----------------------------+
| Field             | Value                      |
+-------------------+----------------------------+
| availability_zone | central                    |
| created_at        | 2019-03-25T22:23:25.000000 |
| deleted           | False                      |
| deleted_at        | None                       |
| hosts             | [u'compute-0.localdomain'] |
| id                | 9                          |
| name              | central                    |
| properties        |                            |
| updated_at        | None                       |
+-------------------+----------------------------+
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ nova availability-zone-list
+----------------------------+----------------------------------------+
| Name                       | Status                                 |
+----------------------------+----------------------------------------+
| internal                   | available                              |
| |- openstack-0.localdomain |                                        |
| | |- nova-conductor        | enabled :-) 2019-03-27T18:21:29.000000 |
| | |- nova-scheduler        | enabled :-) 2019-03-27T18:21:31.000000 |
| | |- nova-consoleauth      | enabled :-) 2019-03-27T18:21:34.000000 |
| central                    | available                              |
| |- compute-0.localdomain   |                                        |
| | |- nova-compute          | enabled :-) 2019-03-27T18:21:32.000000 |
+----------------------------+----------------------------------------+
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack compute service list
+----+------------------+-------------------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
| ID | Binary           | Host                    | Zone     | Status  | State | Updated At                 |
+----+------------------+-------------------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
|  1 | nova-scheduler   | openstack-0.localdomain | internal | enabled | up    | 2019-03-27T18:23:31.000000 |
|  2 | nova-consoleauth | openstack-0.localdomain | internal | enabled | up    | 2019-03-27T18:23:34.000000 |
|  3 | nova-conductor   | openstack-0.localdomain | internal | enabled | up    | 2019-03-27T18:23:29.000000 |
|  7 | nova-compute     | compute-0.localdomain   | central  | enabled | up    | 2019-03-27T18:23:32.000000 |
+----+------------------+-------------------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+

Note how a new aggregate and AZ called central has been automatically created. The newly deployed nova-compute service from the compute-0 host in the central stack is automatically added to this aggregate and zone.

The AZ configuration for Cinder can be checked and verified with these commands:

(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack volume service list
+------------------+-------------------------+---------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
| Binary           | Host                    | Zone    | Status  | State | Updated At                 |
+------------------+-------------------------+---------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
| cinder-scheduler | openstack-0.rdocloud    | central | enabled | up    | 2019-03-27T21:17:44.000000 |
| cinder-volume    | compute-0@tripleo_ceph  | central | enabled | up    | 2019-03-27T21:17:44.000000 |
+------------------+-------------------------+---------+---------+-------+----------------------------+

The Cinder AZ configuration shows the ceph backend in the central zone which was deployed by the central stack.

Deploy the edge-0 and edge-1 stacks

Now that the control-plane and central stacks are deployed, we’ll deploy an edge-0 and edge-1 stack. These stacks are similar to the central stack in that they deploy the same roles with the same services. It differs in that the nodes will be managed in a separate stack and it illustrates the separation of deployment and management between edge sites.

The AZs will be configured differently in these stacks as the nova and cinder services will belong to an AZ unique to each the site.

The edge-0 stack is deployed with the following command:

openstack overcloud deploy \
  --verbose \
  --stack edge-0 \
  --templates /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates \
  -r distributed-roles-data.yaml \
  -n site_network_data.yaml \
  --disable-validations \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker-ha.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo/environments/containers-prepare-parameter.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/deployed-server-environment.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/deployed-server-bootstrap-environment-centos.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/net-multiple-nics.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/tripleo-heat-templates/environments/low-memory-usage.yaml \
  -e role-counts.yaml \
  -e hostnamemap.yaml \
  -e network-environment.yaml \
  -e deployed-server-port-map.yaml \
  -e ceph-environment.yaml \
  -e az.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/endpoint-map.json \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/all-nodes-extra-map-data.json \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/global-config-extra-map-data.json \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/extra-host-file-entries.json \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/oslo.yaml \
  -e /home/centos/control-plane-export/passwords.yaml

--stack edge-0 sets the stack name to edge-0.

distributed-roles-data.yaml contains a single role called DistributedComputeHCI which contains Nova, Cinder, and Ceph services. The example role is from the templates directory at roles/DistributedComputeHCI.yaml. This file is the same as was used in the central stack.

role-counts.yaml contains:

parameter_defaults:
  DistributedComputeHCICount: 1

az.yaml contains specific content for the edge-0 stack:

parameter_defaults:
  CinderStorageAvailabilityZone: 'edge-0'
  NovaComputeAvailabilityZone: 'edge-0'
  NovaAZAttach: false

The CinderStorageAvailabilityZone and NovaDefaultAvailabilityZone parameters are set to edge-0 to match the stack name.

All of the environment files under the control-plane-export subdirectory were generated from the commands from example_export_dcn and are the same files that were used with the central stack.

The edge-1 stack is deployed with a similar command. The stack is given a different name with --stack edge-1 and az.yaml contains:

parameter_defaults:
  CinderStorageAvailabilityZone: 'edge-1'
  NovaComputeAvailabilityZone: 'edge-1'
  NovaAZAttach: false

When the deployment completes, there are now 4 stacks are deployed:

(undercloud) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack stack list
+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+
| ID                                   | Stack Name    | Project                          | Stack Status    | Creation Time        | Updated Time         |
+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+
| 203dc480-3b0b-4cd9-9f70-f79898461c17 | edge-0        | c117a9b489384603b2f45185215e9728 | CREATE_COMPLETE | 2019-03-29T17:30:15Z | None                 |
| 0bdade63-4645-4490-a540-24be48527e10 | central       | c117a9b489384603b2f45185215e9728 | CREATE_COMPLETE | 2019-03-25T21:35:49Z | None                 |
| 5f172fd8-97a5-4b9b-8d4c-2c931fd048e7 | control-plane | c117a9b489384603b2f45185215e9728 | UPDATE_COMPLETE | 2019-03-13T18:51:08Z | 2019-03-13T19:44:27Z |
+--------------------------------------+---------------+----------------------------------+-----------------+----------------------+----------------------+

Repeating the same commands that were run after the central stack was deployed to show the AZ configuration, shows that the new AZs for edge-0 and edge-1 are created and available:

(undercloud) [centos@scale ~]$ source control-planerc
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack aggregate list
+----+---------+-------------------+
| ID | Name    | Availability Zone |
+----+---------+-------------------+
|  9 | central | central           |
| 10 | edge-0  | edge-0            |
| 11 | edge-1  | edge-1            |
+----+---------+-------------------+
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack aggregate show edge-0
+-------------------+----------------------------+
| Field             | Value                      |
+-------------------+----------------------------+
| availability_zone | edge-0                     |
| created_at        | 2019-03-29T19:01:59.000000 |
| deleted           | False                      |
| deleted_at        | None                       |
| hosts             | [u'compute-1.localdomain'] |
| id                | 10                         |
| name              | edge-0                     |
| properties        |                            |
| updated_at        | None                       |
+-------------------+----------------------------+
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ nova availability-zone-list
+----------------------------+----------------------------------------+
| Name                       | Status                                 |
+----------------------------+----------------------------------------+
| internal                   | available                              |
| |- openstack-0.localdomain |                                        |
| | |- nova-conductor        | enabled :-) 2019-04-01T17:38:06.000000 |
| | |- nova-scheduler        | enabled :-) 2019-04-01T17:38:13.000000 |
| | |- nova-consoleauth      | enabled :-) 2019-04-01T17:38:09.000000 |
| central                    | available                              |
| |- compute-0.localdomain   |                                        |
| | |- nova-compute          | enabled :-) 2019-04-01T17:38:07.000000 |
| edge-0                     | available                              |
| |- compute-1.localdomain   |                                        |
| | |- nova-compute          | enabled :-) 2019-04-01T17:38:07.000000 |
| edge-1                     | available                              |
| |- compute-2.localdomain   |                                        |
| | |- nova-compute          | enabled :-) 2019-04-01T17:38:06.000000 |
+----------------------------+----------------------------------------+
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack compute service list
+----+------------------+-------------------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
| ID | Binary           | Host                    | Zone     | Status  | State | Updated At                 |
+----+------------------+-------------------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
|  1 | nova-scheduler   | openstack-0.localdomain | internal | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:23.000000 |
|  2 | nova-consoleauth | openstack-0.localdomain | internal | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:19.000000 |
|  3 | nova-conductor   | openstack-0.localdomain | internal | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:26.000000 |
|  7 | nova-compute     | compute-0.localdomain   | central  | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:27.000000 |
| 16 | nova-compute     | compute-1.localdomain   | edge-0   | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:27.000000 |
| 17 | nova-compute     | compute-2.localdomain   | edge-1   | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:26.000000 |
+----+------------------+-------------------------+----------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$ openstack volume service list
+------------------+-------------------------+---------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
| Binary           | Host                    | Zone    | Status  | State | Updated At                 |
+------------------+-------------------------+---------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
| cinder-scheduler | openstack-0.rdocloud    | central | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:27.000000 |
| cinder-volume    | hostgroup@tripleo_iscsi | central | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:27.000000 |
| cinder-volume    | compute-0@tripleo_ceph  | central | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:30.000000 |
| cinder-volume    | compute-1@tripleo_ceph  | edge-0  | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:32.000000 |
| cinder-volume    | compute-2@tripleo_ceph  | edge-1  | enabled | up    | 2019-04-01T17:38:28.000000 |
+------------------+-------------------------+---------+---------+-------+----------------------------+
(control-plane) [centos@scale ~]$
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License

Except where otherwise noted, this document is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. See all OpenStack Legal Documents.