Appendix P: Managing Power Events

Overview

Once your OpenStack cloud is deployed and in production you will need to consider how to manage applications in terms of shutting them down and starting them up. Examples of situations where this knowledge would be useful include controlled power events such as node reboots and restarting an AZ (or an entire cloud). You will also be better able to counter uncontrolled power events like a power outage. This guide covers how to manage these kinds of power events in your cloud successfully.

For the purposes of this document, a node is any non-containerised system that houses at least one cloud service. In practice, this typically constitutes a physical host.

In addition, any known issues affecting the restarting of parts of the cloud stack are documented. Although they are presented last, it is highly recommended to review them prior to attempting to apply any of the information shown here.

An important assumption made in this document is that the cloud is hyperconverged. That is, multiple applications cohabit each cloud node. This aspect makes a power event especially significant as it can potentially affect the entire cloud.

Note

This document may help influence a cloud’s initial design. Once it is understood how an application should be treated in the context of a power event the cloud architect will be able to make better informed decisions.

Section Notable applications contains valuable information when stopping and starting services. It will be used in the context of power events but its contents can also be used during the normal operation of a cloud.

General guidelines

As each cloud is unique this section will provide general guidelines on how to prepare for and manage power events in your cloud.

Important

It is recommended that every deployed cloud have a list of detailed procedures that cover the uniqueness of that cloud. The guidelines in this current document can act as starting point for such a resource.

HA applications

Theoretically, an application with high availability is resilient to a power event, meaning that one would have no impact on both client requests to the application and the application itself. However, depending on the situation, some such applications may still require attention when starting back up. The percona-cluster application is a good example of this.

Cloud applications are typically made highly available through the use of the hacluster subordinate charm. Some applications, though, achieve HA at the software layer (outside of Juju), and can be called natively HA. One such application is rabbitmq-server. See OpenStack high availability for more information.

Cloud topology

The very first step is to map out the topology of your cloud. In other words, you need to know what application units are running on what machines, and whether those machines are physical (metal), virtual (kvm), or container (lxd) in nature. Each application’s HA status should also be indicated.

A natural way for Juju operators to map out their cloud is by inspecting the output of the juju status command. For a demonstration see Cloud topology example. It is based on this production Reference cloud.

Control plane, data plane, and shutdown order

Data plane services involve networking, storage, and virtualisation, whereas control plane services are necessary to administer and operate the cloud. See High availability and Control plane architecture for more details.

When a cloud is in production the priority for the administrator is to ensure that instances and their associated workloads continue to run. This means that in terms of the impact a power event may have, the data plane has priority over the control plane.

Generally, data plane services (DP) are stopped prior to control plane (CP) services. Also, services within a plane will typically depend upon another service within that same plane. The conclusion is that the dependant service should be brought down before the service being depended upon (e.g. stop Nova before stopping Ceph).

In terms of core applications then, an approximate service shutdown ordered list can be built to act as a general guideline. Some services, such as API services, have less, if any, impact on other services and can therefore be turned off in any order.

In the below list, the most notable aspects are the extremes: nova-compute and Ceph should be stopped first and keystone, rabbitmq-server, and percona-cluster should be stopped last:

  1. nova-compute (DP)

  2. ceph-osd (DP)

  3. ceph-mon (DP)

  4. ceph-radosgw (DP)

  5. neutron-gateway (DP)

  6. neutron-openvswitch (DP)

  7. glance (CP)

  8. cinder (CP)

  9. neutron-gateway (CP)

  10. neutron-api (CP)

  11. placement (CP)

  12. nova-cloud-controller (CP)

  13. keystone (CP)

  14. rabbitmq-server (CP)

  15. percona-cluster (CP)

Each node can now be analysed to see what applications it hosts and in what order they should be stopped.

Stopping and starting services

When stopping a service (not an entire application and not a unit agent) on a hyperconverged cloud node it is safer to act on each unit and stop the service individually. The alternative is to power down the node hosting the service, which will, of course, stop every other service hosted on that node. Ensure that you understand the consequences of powering down a node.

In addition, whenever a service is stopped on a node you need to know what impact that will have on the cloud. For instance, the default effect of turning off a Ceph OSD is that data will be re-distributed among the other OSDs, resulting in high disk and network activity. Most services should be in HA mode but you should be aware of the quorum that must be maintained in order for HA to function as designed. For example, turning off two out of three Keystone cluster members is not advisable.

Wherever possible, this document shows how to manage services with Juju actions. Apart from their intrinsic benefits (i.e. sanctioned by experts), actions are not hampered by SSH-restricted environments. Note that a charm may not implement every desired command in the form of an action however. In that case, the only alternative is to interact directly with the unit’s operating system via SSH.

Important

When an action is used the resulting state persists within Juju, and, in particular, will survive a node reboot. This can be very advantageous in the context of controlled shutdown and startup procedures, but it does demand tracking on the part of the operator. To assist with this, some charms expose action information in the output of the juju status command .

When actions are not used, in terms of starting services on a single node or across a cloud, it may not be possible to do so in a prescribed order unless the services were explicitly configured to not start automatically during the bootup of a node.

Regardless of whether a service is started with a Juju action, via SSH, or by booting the corresponding node, it is vital that you verify afterwards that the service is actually running and functioning properly.

Controlled power events

The heart of managing your cloud in terms of controlled power events is the power-cycling of an individual cloud node. Once you’re able to make decisions on a per-node basis extending the power event to a group of nodes, such as an AZ or even an entire cloud, will become less daunting.

Power-cycling a cloud node

When a hyperconverged cloud node requires to be power-cycled begin by considering the cloud topology, at least for the machine in question.

To illustrate, machines 17, 18, 20 from the Cloud topology example will be used. Note that only fundamental applications will be included (i.e. applications such as openstack-dashboard, ceilometer, etc. will be omitted).

The main issue behind power-cycling a node is to come up with a shutdown list of services, as the startup list is typically just the shutdown list in reverse. This is what is shown below for each machine. Information regarding HA status and machine type has been retained (from the source topology example).

The shutdown lists are based on section Control plane, data plane, and shutdown order.

machine 17

  1. nova-compute (metal)

  2. ceph-osd (natively HA; metal)

  3. ceph-mon (natively HA; lxd)

  4. ceph-radosgw (natively HA; lxd)

  5. glance (HA; lxd)

  6. cinder (HA; lxd)

  7. keystone (HA; lxd)

  8. percona-cluster (HA; lxd)

machine 18

  1. nova-compute (metal)

  2. ceph-osd (natively HA; metal)

  3. neutron-api (HA; lxd)

  4. nova-cloud-controller (HA; lxd)

  5. rabbitmq-server (natively HA; lxd)

machine 20

  1. ceph-osd (natively HA; metal)

  2. neutron-gateway (natively HA; metal)

  3. neutron-api (HA; lxd)

  4. nova-cloud-controller (HA; lxd)

  5. rabbitmq-server (natively HA; lxd)

See section Notable applications for instructions on stopping individual services.

Power-cycling an AZ or an entire cloud

Apart from the difference in scale of the service outage, stopping and starting an AZ (availability zone) or an entire cloud is a superset of the case of power-cycling an individual node. You just need to identify the group of nodes that are involved. An AZ or cloud would consist of all of the core services listed in section Control plane, data plane, and shutdown order.

Uncontrolled power events

In the context of this document, an uncontrolled power event is an unintended power outage. The result of such an event is that one or many physical cloud hosts have turned off non-gracefully. Since we now know that some cloud services should be stopped in a particular order and in a particular way the task now is to ascertain what services could have been negatively impacted and how to proceed in getting such services back in working order.

Begin as was done in the case of Power-cycling a cloud node by determining the topology of the affected nodes. See whether any corresponding services have special shutdown procedures as documented in section Notable applications. Any such services will require special scrutiny when they are eventually started. Determine an ordered startup list for the affected services. As was shown in Power-cycling a cloud node, this list is the reverse of the shutdown list. Finally, once the nodes are powered on, by abiding as much as possible to the startup list, act on any verification steps found in section Notable applications for all cloud services.

Important

To prevent affected machines from turning back on automatically, and thus interfering with the startup procedures for your cloud, it is recommended to disable the auto-poweron BIOS setting on all cloud nodes.

Notable applications

This section contains application-specific shutdown/restart procedures, well-known caveats, or just valuable tips.

As noted under Stopping and starting services, this document encourages the use of actions for managing application services. The general syntax is:

juju run-action --wait <unit> <action>

In the procedures that follow, <unit> will be replaced by an example only (e.g. nova-compute/0). You will need to substitute in the actual unit for your cloud.

For convenience, the applications are listed here (you can also use the table of contents in the upper left-hand-side):

ceph-osd

cinder

keystone

neutron-openvswitch

percona-cluster

ceph-mon

etcd

landscape

nova-compute

rabbitmq-server

ceph-radosgw

glance

neutron-gateway

nova-cloud-controller

vault


ceph

All Ceph services are grouped under this one heading.

Note

Some ceph-related charms are lacking in actions. Some procedures will involve direct intervention. See bugs LP #1846049, LP #1846050, LP #1849222, and LP #1849224.

shutdown

With respect to powering down a node that hosts an OSD, by default, the Ceph CRUSH map is configured to treat each cluster machine as a failure domain. The default pool behaviour is to replicate data across three failure domains, and require at least two of them to be present to accept writes. Shutting down multiple machines too quickly may cause two of three copies of a particular placement group to become temporarily unavailable, which would cause consuming applications to block on writes. The CRUSH map can be configured to spread replicas over a failure domain other than machines. See CRUSH maps in the Ceph documentation.

The shutdown procedures for Ceph are provided for both a cluster and for individual components (e.g. ceph-mon).

cluster
  1. Ensure that the cluster is in a healthy state. From a Juju client, run a status check on any MON unit:

    juju ssh ceph-mon/1 sudo ceph status
    
  2. Shut down all components/clients consuming Ceph before shutting down Ceph components to avoid application-level data loss.

  3. Set the cluster-wide noout option, on any MON unit, to prevent data rebalancing from occurring when OSDs start disappearing from the network:

    juju run-action --wait ceph-mon/1 set-noout
    

    Query status again to ensure that the option is set:

    juju ssh ceph-mon/1 sudo ceph status
    

    Expected partial output is:

    health: HEALTH_WARN
    noout flag(s) set
    
  4. Stop the RADOS Gateway service on each ceph-radosgw unit.

    First get the current status:

    juju ssh ceph-radosgw/0 systemctl status ceph-radosgw@\*
    

    Example partial output is:

    ● ceph-radosgw@rgw.ip-172-31-93-254.service - Ceph rados gateway
       Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/ceph-radosgw@.service; indirect; vendor
       preset: enabled)
          Active: active (running) since Mon 2019-09-30 21:33:53 UTC; 9min ago
    

    Now pause the service:

    juju run-action --wait ceph-radosgw/0 pause
    

    Verify that the service has stopped:

    juju ssh ceph-radosgw/0 systemctl status ceph-radosgw@\*
    

    Expected output is null (no output).

  5. Mark all of a unit’s OSDs as ‘out’. Do this on each ceph-osd unit:

    juju run-action --wait ceph-osd/1 osd-out
    

    Once done, verify that all of the cluster’s OSDs are out:

    juju ssh ceph-mon/1 sudo ceph status
    

    Assuming a total of six OSDs, expected partial output (“0 in”) is:

    osd: 6 osds: 6 up, 0 in; 66 remapped pgs
    
  6. Stop the MON service on each ceph-mon unit:

    juju ssh ceph-mon/0 sudo systemctl stop ceph-mon.service
    

    Verify that the MON service has stopped on each unit:

    juju ssh ceph-mon/0 systemctl status ceph-mon.service
    

    Expected partial output is:

    Active: inactive (dead) since Mon 2019-09-30 19:46:09 UTC; 1h 1min ago
    

Important

Once the MON units have lost quorum you will lose the ability to query the cluster.

component
  1. Ensure that the cluster is in a healthy state. On any MON:

    juju ssh ceph-mon/1 sudo ceph status
    
  2. ceph-mon - To bring down a single MON service:

    1. Stop the MON service on the ceph-mon unit:

      juju ssh ceph-mon/0 sudo systemctl stop ceph-mon.service
      
    2. Do not bring down another MON until the cluster has recovered from the loss of the current one (run a status check).

  3. ceph-osd - To bring down all the OSDs on a single unit:

    1. Mark all the OSDs on the ceph-osd unit as ‘out’:

      juju run-action --wait ceph-osd/2 osd-out
      
    2. Do not mark OSDs on another unit as ‘out’ until the cluster has recovered from the loss of the current one (run a status check).

startup

The startup procedures for Ceph are provided for both a cluster and for individual components (e.g. ceph-mon).

cluster

Nodes hosting Ceph services should be powered on such that the services are started in this order:

  1. ceph-mon

  2. ceph-osd

  3. ceph-radosgw

Important: If during cluster shutdown,

  1. a unit’s OSDs were marked as ‘out’ then you must re-insert them. Do this for each ceph-osd unit:

    juju run-action --wait ceph-osd/0 osd-in
    
  2. the noout option was set, you will need to unset it. On any MON unit:

    juju run-action --wait ceph-mon/0 unset-noout
    
  3. a RADOS Gateway service was paused, you will need to resume it. Do this for each ceph-radosgw unit:

    juju run-action --wait ceph-radosgw/0 resume
    

Finally, ensure that the cluster is in a healthy state by running a status check on any MON unit:

juju ssh ceph-mon/0 sudo ceph status
component
  1. Ensure that the cluster is in a healthy state. On any MON:

    juju ssh ceph-mon/0 sudo ceph status
    
  2. ceph-mon - To bring up a single MON service:

    1. Start the MON service on the ceph-mon unit:

      juju ssh ceph-mon/1 sudo systemctl start ceph-mon.service
      
    2. Do not bring up another MON until the cluster has recovered from the addition of the current one (run a status check).

  3. ceph-osd - To bring up all the OSDs on a unit:

    1. Re-insert the OSDs on the ceph-osd unit:

      juju run-action --wait ceph-osd/1 osd-in
      
    2. Do not re-insert OSDs on another unit until the cluster has recovered from the addition of the current ones (run a status check).

Important

Individual OSDs on a unit cannot be started or stopped using actions. They are managed as a collective.


cinder

shutdown

To pause the Cinder service:

juju run-action --wait cinder/0 pause

startup

To resume the Cinder service:

juju run-action --wait cinder/0 resume

etcd

Note

The etcd charm is lacking in actions. Some procedures will involve direct intervention. See bug LP #1846257.

shutdown

To stop the Etcd service:

juju ssh etcd/0 sudo systemctl stop snap.etcd.etcd

startup

To start the Etcd service:

juju ssh etcd/0 sudo systemctl start snap.etcd.etcd

read queries

To see the etcd cluster status. On any etcd unit:

juju run-action --wait etcd/0 health

loss of etcd quorum

If the majority of the etcd units fail (e.g. 2 out of 3) you can scale down the cluster (e.g. 3 to 1). However, if all hooks have not had a chance to run (e.g. you may have to force remove and redeploy faulty units) the surviving master will not accept new cluster members/units. In that case, do the following:

  1. Scale down the cluster to 1 unit any way you can (remove faulty units / stop the etcd service / delete the database on the slave units).

  2. Force the surviving master to become a 1-node cluster. On the appropriate unit:

    1. Stop the service:

      juju ssh etcd/0 sudo systemctl stop snap.etcd.etcd
      
    2. Connect to the unit via SSH and edit /var/snap/etcd/common/etcd.conf.yml by setting force-new-cluster to ‘true’.

    3. Start the service:

      juju ssh etcd/0 sudo systemctl start snap.etcd.etcd
      
    4. Connect to the unit via SSH and edit /var/snap/etcd/common/etcd.conf.yml by setting force-new-cluster to ‘false’.

  3. Scale up the cluster by adding new etcd units.


glance

shutdown

To pause the Glance service:

juju run-action --wait glance/0 pause

Important

If Glance is clustered using the ‘hacluster’ charm, first pause hacluster and then pause Glance.

startup

To resume the Glance service:

juju run-action --wait glance/0 resume

Important

If Glance is clustered using the ‘hacluster’ charm, first resume Glance and then resume hacluster.


keystone

shutdown

To pause the Keystone service:

juju run-action --wait keystone/0 pause

Important

If Keystone is clustered using the ‘hacluster’ charm, first pause hacluster and then pause Keystone.

startup

To resume the Keystone service:

juju run-action --wait keystone/0 resume

Important

If Keystone is clustered using the ‘hacluster’ charm, first resume Keystone and then resume hacluster.


landscape

Note

The postgresql charm, needed by Landscape, is lacking in actions. Some procedures will involve direct intervention. See bug LP #1846279.

shutdown

  1. Pause the Landscape service:

    juju run-action --wait landscape-server/0 pause
    
  2. Stop the PostgreSQL service:

    juju ssh postgresql/0 sudo systemctl stop postgresql
    
  3. Pause the RabbitMQ service:

    juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/0 pause
    

Caution

Services other than Landscape may also be using either of the PostgreSQL or RabbitMQ services.

startup

The startup of Landscape should be done in the reverse order.

  1. Ensure the RabbitMQ service is started:

    juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/0 pause
    
  2. Ensure the PostgreSQL service is started:

    juju ssh postgresql/0 sudo systemctl start postgresql
    
  3. Resume the Landscape service:

    juju run-action --wait landscape-server/0 pause
    

neutron-gateway

neutron agents

A cloud outage will occur if a node hosting a non-HA neutron-gateway is power cycled due to the lack of neutron agents.

Before stopping the service you can manually check for HA status of neutron agents on the node using the commands below. HA is confirmed by the presence of more than one agent per router, in the case of L3 agents, and more than one per network, in the case of DHCP agents.

To return the list of L3 agents serving each of the routers connected to a node:

for i in `openstack network agent list | grep L3 | awk '/$NODE/ {print $2}'` ; \
    do printf "\nAgent $i serves:" ; \
    for f in `neutron router-list-on-l3-agent $i | awk '/network_id/ {print$2}'` ; \
    do printf "\n Router $f served by these agents:\n" ; \
    neutron l3-agent-list-hosting-router $f ; \
    done ; done

To return the list of DHCP agents serving each of the networks connected to a node:

for i in `openstack network agent list| grep -i dhcp |  awk '/$NODE/ {print $2}'` ; \
    do printf "\nAgent $i serves:" ; \
    for f in `neutron net-list-on-dhcp-agent $i | awk '!/+/ {print$2}'` ; \
    do printf "\nNetwork $f served by these agents:\n" ; \
    neutron dhcp-agent-list-hosting-net $f ; \
    done ; done

Note

Replace $NODE with the node hostname as known to OpenStack (i.e. openstack host list).

shutdown

To pause a Neutron gateway service:

juju run-action --wait neutron-gateway/0 pause

startup

To resume a Neutron gateway service:

juju run-action --wait neutron-gateway/0 resume

neutron-openvswitch

shutdown

To pause the Open vSwitch service:

juju run-action --wait neutron-openvswitch/0 pause

startup

To resume the Open vSwitch service:

juju run-action --wait neutron-openvswitch/0 resume

nova-cloud-controller

shutdown

To pause Nova controller services (Nova scheduler, Nova api, Nova network, Nova objectstore):

juju run-action --wait nova-cloud-controller/0 pause

startup

To resume Nova controller services:

juju run-action --wait nova-cloud-controller/0 resume

nova-compute

shutdown

True HA is not possible for nova-compute nor its instances. If a node hosting this service is power-cycled the corresponding hypervisor is removed from the pool of available hypervisors, and its instances will become inaccessible. Generally speaking, individual hypervisors are fallible components in a cloud. The standard response to this is to implement HA on the instance workloads. Provided shared storage is set up, you can also move instances to another compute node and boot them anew (state is lost) - see Evacuate instances.

To stop a Nova service:

  1. Some affected nova instances may require a special shutdown sequence (e.g. an instance may host a workload that demands particular care when turning it off). Invoke them now.

  2. Gracefully stop all remaining affected nova instances.

  3. Pause the Nova service:

    juju run-action --wait nova-compute/0 pause
    

Tip

If shared storage is implemented, instead of shutting down instances you may consider moving (“evacuating”) them to another compute node. See Evacuate instances.

startup

To resume a Nova service:

juju run-action --wait nova-compute/0 resume

Instances that fail to come up properly can be moved to another compute host (see Evacuate instances).


percona-cluster

shutdown

To pause the Percona XtraDB service for a percona-cluster unit:

juju run-action --wait percona-cluster/0 pause

To gracefully shut down the cluster repeat the above for every unit.

startup

A special startup procedure is necessary regardless of how services were shut down (gracefully, hard shutdown, or power outage).

Upon startup the cluster will be in a state described by either scenario 3 or 6 in the upstream document How to recover a PXC cluster. The latter documentation provides important context to the steps outlined below.

Both scenarios will require a unit to be assigned the role of “bootstrap node”.

Warning

Data loss may occur if an incorrect bootstrap node is chosen.

The steps will also involve the concept of application unit leadership. An application leader unit is denoted by an asterisk in the Unit column of the juju status output.

Determine the bootstrap node

Determine the bootstrap node by examining Percona XtraDB sequence numbers. The percona-cluster units either have the same sequence number or they do not. Sequence numbers are displayed in the output of the juju status command.

Note

Alternatively, the sequence number can be found on the corresponding machine’s filesystem in file /var/lib/percona-xtradb-cluster/grastate.dat.

Example #1 - Same sequence number

In this output the units have a common sequence number of ‘355’. This indicates that any unit can act as the bootstrap node:

Unit                Workload  Agent  Machine  Public address  Ports     Message
keystone/0*         active    idle   0        10.5.0.32       5000/tcp  Unit is ready
percona-cluster/0   blocked   idle   1        10.5.0.20       3306/tcp  MySQL is down. Sequence Number: 355. Safe To Bootstrap: 0
  hacluster/0       active    idle            10.5.0.20                 Unit is ready and clustered
percona-cluster/1   blocked   idle   2        10.5.0.17       3306/tcp  MySQL is down. Sequence Number: 355. Safe To Bootstrap: 0
  hacluster/1       active    idle            10.5.0.17                 Unit is ready and clustered
percona-cluster/2*  blocked   idle   3        10.5.0.27       3306/tcp  MySQL is down. Sequence Number: 355. Safe To Bootstrap: 0
  hacluster/2*      active    idle            10.5.0.27                 Unit is ready and clustered

Example #2 - Different sequence numbers

In this output the units do not have a common sequence number. The unit chosen as the bootstrap node must be the one with the greatest sequence number. Here it is unit percona-cluster/2, with a number of ‘1325’:

Unit                Workload  Agent  Machine  Public address  Ports     Message
keystone/0*         active    idle   0        10.5.0.32       5000/tcp  Unit is ready
percona-cluster/0*  blocked   idle   1        10.5.0.20       3306/tcp  MySQL is down. Sequence Number: 1318. Safe To Bootstrap: 0
  hacluster/0*      active    idle            10.5.0.20                 Unit is ready and clustered
percona-cluster/1   blocked   idle   2        10.5.0.17       3306/tcp  MySQL is down. Sequence Number: 1318. Safe To Bootstrap: 0
  hacluster/1       active    idle            10.5.0.17                 Unit is ready and clustered
percona-cluster/2   blocked   idle   3        10.5.0.27       3306/tcp  MySQL is down. Sequence Number: 1325. Safe To Bootstrap: 0
  hacluster/2       active    idle            10.5.0.27                 Unit is ready and clustered
Initialise the cluster

Initialise the cluster by running the bootstrap-pxc action on the chosen bootstrap node unit. In this example it is percona-cluster/2, which happens to be a non-leader.

juju run-action --wait percona-cluster/2 bootstrap-pxc
Notify the cluster of the new bootstrap UUID

The cluster will typically require being notified of the new “bootstrap UUID”.

In the vast majority of cases, once the bootstrap-pxc action has been run, and the model has settled, the output to the juju status command will look like this:

Unit                Workload  Agent  Machine  Public address  Ports     Message
keystone/0*         active    idle   0        10.5.0.32       5000/tcp  Unit is ready
percona-cluster/0*  waiting   idle   1        10.5.0.20       3306/tcp  Unit waiting for cluster bootstrap
  hacluster/0*      active    idle            10.5.0.20                 Unit is ready and clustered
percona-cluster/1   waiting   idle   2        10.5.0.17       3306/tcp  Unit waiting for cluster bootstrap
  hacluster/1       active    idle            10.5.0.17                 Unit is ready and clustered
percona-cluster/2   waiting   idle   3        10.5.0.27       3306/tcp  Unit waiting for cluster bootstrap
  hacluster/2       active    idle            10.5.0.27                 Unit is ready and clustered

The message “Unit waiting for cluster bootstrap” indicates that the cluster needs to be notified of the new bootstrap UUID, and is done via the notify-bootstrapped action. Which unit to apply this action against depends on how the previous action was used:

  1. If bootstrap-pxc was run on the leader then notify-bootstrapped must be run on a non-leader.

  2. Inversely, if bootstrap-pxc was run on a non-leader then notify-bootstrapped must be run on the leader.

In the current example, the first action was run on a non-leader (percona-cluster/2). The second action should therefore be run on the leader, which here is percona-cluster/0:

juju run-action --wait percona-cluster/0 notify-bootstrapped

After the model settles, the status output should show all nodes in active and ready state:

Unit                Workload  Agent  Machine  Public address  Ports     Message
keystone/0*         active    idle   0        10.5.0.32       5000/tcp  Unit is ready
percona-cluster/0*  active    idle   1        10.5.0.20       3306/tcp  Unit is ready
  hacluster/0*      active    idle            10.5.0.20                 Unit is ready and clustered
percona-cluster/1   active    idle   2        10.5.0.17       3306/tcp  Unit is ready
  hacluster/1       active    idle            10.5.0.17                 Unit is ready and clustered
percona-cluster/2   active    idle   3        10.5.0.27       3306/tcp  Unit is ready
  hacluster/2       active    idle            10.5.0.27                 Unit is ready and clustered

The percona-cluster application is now back to a clustered and healthy state.


rabbitmq-server

shutdown

To pause a RabbitMQ service:

juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/0 pause

startup

To resume a RabbitMQ service:

juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/0 resume

read queries

Provided rabbitmq is running on a rabbitmq-server unit, you can perform a status check:

juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/1 cluster-status

Example partial output is:

Cluster status of node 'rabbit@ip-172-31-13-243'
 [{nodes,[{disc,['rabbit@ip-172-31-13-243']}]},
  {running_nodes,['rabbit@ip-172-31-13-243']},
  {cluster_name,<<"rabbit@ip-172-31-13-243.ec2.internal">>},
  {partitions,[]},
  {alarms,[{'rabbit@ip-172-31-13-243',[]}]}]

It is expected that there are no objects listed on the partitions line (as above).

To list unconsumed queues (those with pending messages):

juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/1 list-unconsumed-queues

See Partitions and Queues in the RabbitMQ documentation.

partitions

Any partitioned units will need to be attended to. Stop and start the rabbitmq-server service for each rabbitmq-server unit, checking for status along the way:

juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/0 pause
juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/1 cluster-status
juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/0 pause
juju run-action --wait rabbitmq-server/1 cluster-status

If errors persist, the mnesia database will need to be removed from the affected unit so it can be resynced from the other units. Do this by removing the contents of the /var/lib/rabbitmq/mnesia directory between the stop and start commands.

Note

The network partitioning handling mode configured by the rabbitmq-server charm is autoheal.


vault

Note

The vault charm is lacking in actions. Some procedures will involve direct intervention. See bug LP #1846282.

shutdown

To pause a Vault service:

juju run-action --wait vault/0 pause

startup

To resume a Vault service:

juju run-action --wait vault/0 resume

read queries

To see Vault service status:

juju ssh vault/0 /snap/bin/vault status

Expected output is:

Cluster is sealed

unsealing units

When Vault is clustered, each unit will manually (and locally) need to be unsealed with its respective VAULT_ADDR environment variable and with the minimum number of unseal keys (three here):

export VAULT_ADDR="http://<IP of vault unit>:8200"
vault operator unseal <key>
vault operator unseal <key>
vault operator unseal <key>

See the Vault appendix in the Charms Deployment Guide for more details.

Known issues

  • LP #1804261 : ceph-osds will need to be restarted if they start before Vault is ready and unsealed

  • LP #1818260 : forget cluster node failed during cluster-relation-changed hook

  • LP #1818680 : booting should succeed even if vault is unavailable

  • LP #1818973 : vault fails to start when MySQL backend down

  • LP #1827690 : barbican-worker is down: Requested revision 1a0c2cdafb38 overlaps with other requested revisions 39cf2e645cba

  • LP #1840706 : install hook fails with psycopg2 ImportError

Consult each charm’s bug tracker for full bug listings. See the OpenStack Charms project group.